Ronen Reblogs
joeyart:

Since Its comic con week. here’s Wonder woman riding a 2 headed black rainbow pega unicorn while holding a 2 head lightsaber. the horse shoot out lighting from their unicorn too

joeyart:

Since Its comic con week. here’s Wonder woman riding a 2 headed black rainbow pega unicorn while holding a 2 head lightsaber. the horse shoot out lighting from their unicorn too

klaatu:

Final Girl Official Trailer #1 (2014) - Abigail Breslin, Alexander Ludwig Movie HD

zeroing:

Herb Ritts
I was an ordinary person
who studied hard.

Richard Feynman, theoretical physicist, d. 1988 (via whats-out-there)

••••••

Context:

"You ask me if an ordinary person could ever get to be able to imagine these things like I imagine them. Of course! I was an ordinary person who studied hard. There are no miracle people. It happens they get interested in this thing and they learn all this stuff, but they’re just people. There’s no talent, no special ability to understand quantum mechanics, or to imagine electromagnetic fields, that comes without practice and reading and learning and study. I was not born understanding quantum mechanics — I still don’t understand quantum mechanics! I was born not knowing things were made out of atoms, and not being able to visualize, therefore, when I saw the bottle of milk that I was sucking, that it was a dynamic bunch of balls bouncing around. I had to learn that just like anybody else. So if you take an ordinary person who is willing to devote a great deal of time and work and thinking and mathematics, then he’s become a scientist!”

••••••

True of art, as well.

(via olena)

brand-upon-the-brain:

missing AOL and Yahoo chat rooms rn

(Source: nichotina)

callmeoutis:

i was ready to just scroll past like “haha grammar humor” but then it was weird al and i,

(Source: iraffiruse)

illaminati:

"maybe you shouldnt eat all of tha-"

image

nytimes:

Before Kubrick Was an Auteur
July 25, 2014
Stanley Kubrick, who would have turned 86 on Saturday, was once known professionally as just “Stan Kubrick” — an almost comically breezy abbreviation for the man we know as a titanically exacting director. Then again, Kubrick was only 16 at the time, a precocious boy from the Grand Concourse with a Graflex camera, who had somehow blustered his way into the picture department at Look magazine. For the next five years there, before his movie career began, he held his own with the New York photojournalists of the 1940s, covering street life, prizefights, jazz concerts, stars and starlets, and forging a recognizable style of his own.
Kubrick, who died in 1999 after making 13 movies, later said his magazine years mostly gave him a “quick education in how things happened in the world.” But looking over the thousands of pictures he took, most of them now in the collection of the Museum of the City of New York, you can clearly see his later visual obsessions in chrysalis. He was already taken with the dramatic effect of a crisply lighted subject in a darkened room, foreshadowing the eerie look of “Dr. Strangelove.” In his Look days, Kubrick spent time in laboratories at Columbia University, making portraits that allowed him to experiment with light as fully as the scientists were experimenting with their subjects. His compositions were often vertiginous, full of sly Surrealism for what were supposed to be straight-ahead profile assignments and the kinds of eccentrics favored by a more famous New York street photographer, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), whom Kubrick hired as a set photographer for “Dr. Strangelove.”
All in all, it wasn’t a bad start for an artist the director Paul Mazursky once described as “a kid from the Bronx who didn’t know how to work with actors.”
(Photo: Stanley Kubrick photographs the showgirl Rosemary Williams applying lipstick. 1949.)

nytimes:

Before Kubrick Was an Auteur

July 25, 2014

Stanley Kubrick, who would have turned 86 on Saturday, was once known professionally as just “Stan Kubrick” — an almost comically breezy abbreviation for the man we know as a titanically exacting director. Then again, Kubrick was only 16 at the time, a precocious boy from the Grand Concourse with a Graflex camera, who had somehow blustered his way into the picture department at Look magazine. For the next five years there, before his movie career began, he held his own with the New York photojournalists of the 1940s, covering street life, prizefights, jazz concerts, stars and starlets, and forging a recognizable style of his own.

Kubrick, who died in 1999 after making 13 movies, later said his magazine years mostly gave him a “quick education in how things happened in the world.” But looking over the thousands of pictures he took, most of them now in the collection of the Museum of the City of New York, you can clearly see his later visual obsessions in chrysalis. He was already taken with the dramatic effect of a crisply lighted subject in a darkened room, foreshadowing the eerie look of “Dr. Strangelove.” In his Look days, Kubrick spent time in laboratories at Columbia University, making portraits that allowed him to experiment with light as fully as the scientists were experimenting with their subjects. His compositions were often vertiginous, full of sly Surrealism for what were supposed to be straight-ahead profile assignments and the kinds of eccentrics favored by a more famous New York street photographer, Weegee (Arthur Fellig), whom Kubrick hired as a set photographer for “Dr. Strangelove.”

All in all, it wasn’t a bad start for an artist the director Paul Mazursky once described as “a kid from the Bronx who didn’t know how to work with actors.”

(Photo: Stanley Kubrick photographs the showgirl Rosemary Williams applying lipstick. 1949.)

(Source: mcavoyclub)

gaggedhard:

🐺